Welcome to SIBO Guru

You are likely here because you have taken an antibiotic to address SIBO and it has come back. Do antibiotics fix SIBO long term? More often than not, they don’t. They simply knock the organisms down so you feel like you have recovered for a very short time. Antibiotics may also make it more difficult to rebalance and heal the system long term.

The vast majority of studies on SIBO aren’t looking at a SIBO cure, but rather, looking at which antibiotic therapies will knock SIBO down the longest – whether it reoccurs in 14 days, 3 months or 9 months. The average recidivism rate of Xifaxan (Rifaximin) and a prokinetic (considered the gold standard of treatment) is 4-9 months. Clinically, I find that most people start to notice symptoms reemerge 10-14 days after antibiotic treatment.

SIBO is considered by most to be a reoccurring condition. This means that all the pain, discomfort, and bloating that you are experiencing right now, is likely going to come back within a year. I do not agree with this. I feel strongly that the current way that this is treated is contributing to the high recidivism rate. SIBO is not a primary condition, as it is currently treated (meaning that, SIBO is diagnosed and the patient is offered antibiotics, without further investigation as to WHY this was set up in the first place).

SIBO is a secondary condition; a symptom that something is not right with your system. It is an extreme imbalance in your body that is best addressed from a functional medicine approach: identifying the ROOT CAUSE, and coupling dietary and herbal therapies together to knock down SIBO to the degree that you can address digestive and immune insufficiencies, heal the gut, and rebalance your gut flora.

If you have SIBO, I can help you.

“SIBO is not an infection that you knock out with antibiotics. It is an extreme imbalance in the digestive system that needs to be resolved.”

– Angela Pifer |Functional Medicine Nutritionist